Pocahontas

Pocahontas

Joseph Bruchac

Language: English

Pages: 173

ISBN: 0152054650

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In 1607, when John Smith and his "Coatmen" arrive in Powhatan to begin settling the colony of Virginia, their relations with the village's inhabitants are anything but warm. Pocahontas, the beloved daughter of the Powhatan chief, Mamanatowic, is just eleven; but in spite of her age, this astute young girl acts with wisdom and compassion, and plays a fateful, peaceful role in the destinies of two peoples.
Drawing from the personal journals of John Smith, Joseph Bruchac, winner of the American Book Award for Breaking Silence, reveals an important part of history through the eyes of two historic figures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

friendship, but the Coatmen did not take their hands. Then one of Wowinchopunck’s men picked up a Coatman’s glittering tomahak. “Wingapo,” Wowinchopunck’s man said. “Good man.” But the Coatman who kept that tomahak did not behave in a friendly way. He grabbed the tomahak by its handle and twisted it out of the man’s grasp. Then he struck the surprised Paspahegh man hard on the arm with the flat side of the tomahak, bruising him badly. It was a great insult. Some of our people became quite

news is of some great deed done in battle. Our warriors are proud of their courage and will gladly brag to anyone of the great things they have done—or make up a song about it. That kind of bravery makes my father glad. He knows that his power comes from the bravery of the men and the good minds of the women of our nations. No one could remain in such a high place as he holds were the women and men not behind him. Though it is said that my father is feared, it is also true that he is respected.

to this place. So I told my guide, asking how we might otherwise take flight. But as we went on discoursing, I was struck by an arrow on my right thigh. It did me little harm and I turned to espy two Indians drawing their bows, which I prevented in discharging a French pistol. By the time I had charged again, three or four more Indians had done the like, taking the place of the first who had fallen down and fled. At my next discharge, they also fell and fled. Now my guide I made my barricado,

who offered not to strive but allowed me to use him as my buckler. The aim of the salvages was such that not a single arrow struck him, and his bulk was so much greater than mine that he made a fine shield. Twenty or thirty arrows were shot against me, but fell short or stuck in my clothes with no great hurt. Three or four more times I discharged his pistol ere the King of Pamaunkee, called Opechancanough, with two hundred men environed me. At his command, each drew their bows and then laid them

who offered not to strive but allowed me to use him as my buckler. The aim of the salvages was such that not a single arrow struck him, and his bulk was so much greater than mine that he made a fine shield. Twenty or thirty arrows were shot against me, but fell short or stuck in my clothes with no great hurt. Three or four more times I discharged his pistol ere the King of Pamaunkee, called Opechancanough, with two hundred men environed me. At his command, each drew their bows and then laid them

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