Principles of Transaction Processing for the Systems Professional (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems)

Principles of Transaction Processing for the Systems Professional (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems)

Philip A. Bernstein, Eric Newcomer

Language: English

Pages: 364

ISBN: 1558604154

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Principles of Transaction Processing is a clear, concise guide for anyone
involved in developing applications, evaluating products, designing systems,
or engineering products. This book provides an understanding of the internals of
transaction processing systems, describing how they work and how best to use them.
It includes the architecture of transaction processing monitors, transactional
communications paradigms, and mechanisms for recovering from transaction and
system failures.

Use of transaction processing systems in business, industry, and
government is increasing rapidly; the emergence of electronic commerce on
the Internet is creating new demands. As a result, many developers are
encountering transaction processing applications for the first time and need
a practical explanation of techniques. Software engineers who build and
market operating systems, communications systems, programming tools, and
other products used in transaction processing applications will also benefit
from this thorough presentation of principles. Rich with examples, it
describes commercial transaction processing systems, transactional aspects
of database servers, messaging systems, Internet servers, and
object-oriented systems, as well as each of their subsystems.

* Easy-to-read descriptions of fundamentals.
* Real world examples illustrating key points.
* Focuses on practical issues faced by developers.
* Explains most major products and standards, including IBM's CICS, IMS, and MQSeries; X/Open's XA, STDL, and TX; BEA Systems' TUXEDO; Digital's ACMS; Transarc's Encina; AT&T/NCR's TOP END; Tandem's Pathway/TS; OMG's OTS; and Microsoft's Microsoft Transaction Server.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

you may be familiar with, to see where the differences are and why TP systems are constructed differently from the others. There are several other kinds of systems that we can look at here: • Batch processing systems, where you submit a job and later on get output in the form of a file • Time-sharing systems, where a display device is connected to an operating system process, and within that process you can invoke programs that interact frequently with the display • Real-time systems, where you

symbolic request name to a server identifier. Optionally, it uses parameter-based routing to select the transaction program based on the contents of the request, not just the request name. The workflow controller demarcates the transaction and handles exceptions. Transaction demarcation may be chained, where it identifies only the boundaries between transactions, or unchained, where explicit Start and Commit operations bracket the transaction. Exception handling must cope with transaction aborts

can process the reply right away. D. Transaction 3 committed. The request was submitted and executed, and the client already processed the reply. The client should continue with a new request. To determine what recovery action to take, the client needs to figure out which of the four states it is in. If each client has a private reply queue, it can make some headway in this analysis. Since the client processes one request at a time, the reply queue either is empty or has one reply in it. So, if

is nearly identical to the distributed program link (DPL) command, except that the DPL command executes a program in another CICS region. 5.2 CICS 133 PROCEDURE DIVISION. 001-MAIN SECTION. EXEC CICS HANDLE CONDITION LENGERR (001-LENGTH-ERROR) ERROR (001-GENERAL-ERROR) END EXEC. PERFORM 001-SEND. PERFORM 001-RECEIVE. PERFORM 001-DEBIT. PERFORM 001-CREDIT. PERFORM 001-SUCCESS. EXEC CICS RETURN. END EXEC. 001-SEND SECTION. EXEC CICS SEND MAP ('MAPDBCR') MAPSET ('DBCRSET') MAPONLY ERASE END EXEC.

the client for access to the server.The TRPC propagates transactional context via DCE RPC to one or more servers. chronously with the desired application servers or can use the monitor's Queue Request Facility (based on the RQS) for queued messages for later delivery to servers. The Encina client library generates and caches communications bindings for use in TRPCs. When caches are empty, such as at login time, the client establishes a user context by contacting a DCE security server. Then the

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