The Olive and the Caper: Adventures in Greek Cooking

The Olive and the Caper: Adventures in Greek Cooking

Susanna Hoffman

Language: English

Pages: 608

ISBN: 1563058480

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This is the year "It's Greek to me" becomes the happy answer to what's for dinner. My Big Fat Greek Wedding, the upcoming epic Troy, the 2004 Summer Olympics returning to Athens--and now, yet another reason to embrace all things Greek: The Olive and the Caper, Susanna Hoffman's 700-plus-page serendipity of recipes and adventure.

In Corfu, Ms. Hoffman and a taverna owner cook shrimp fresh from the trap--and for us she offers the boldly-flavored Shrimp with Fennel, Green Olives, Red Onion, and White Wine. She gathers wild greens and herbs with neighbors, inspiring Big Beans with Thyme and Parsley, and Field Greens and Ouzo Pie. She learns the secret to chewy country bread from the baker on Santorini and translates it for American kitchens. Including 325 recipes developed in collaboration with Victoria Wise (her co-author on The Well-Filled Tortilla Cookbook, with over 258,000 copies in print), The Olive and the Caper celebrates all things Greek: Chicken Neo-Avgolemeno. Fall-off-the-bone Lamb Shanks seasoned with garlic, thyme, cinnamon and coriander. Siren-like sweets, from world-renowned Baklava to uniquely Greek preserves: Rose Petal, Cherry and Grappa, Apricot and Metaxa.

In addition, it opens with a sixteen-page full-color section and has dozens of lively essays throughout the book--about the origins of Greek food, about village life, history, language, customs--making this a lively adventure in reading as well as cooking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VEGETABLES, FISH, AND MEAT WERE STREWN—WAS THE PARAMOUNT MEAL OF ANCIENT GREECE. IF IT SOUNDS A LOT LIKE PILAF, AND RESEMBLES THE WAY WE SERVE PASTA, IT ONLY GOES TO PROVE A PAIR OF OLD CLICHES: “THERE’S NOT MUCH NEW UNDER THE STARS” and “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” If the things under the stars and lingering on are delicious, the truisms can only be good things. A man who has not put away a year’s food, including Demeter’s grain, has little interest in quarrels and

away. THE HERBS OF GREECE HERBS, LIKE WILD GREENS AND MUSHROOMS, ARE SOMETHING GREEKS OUTSIDE THE CITIES HAVE ALWAYS GATHERED FROM THE FIELDS, HILLS, AND RIVERBANKS; A FEW, LIKE BASIL AND GERANIUM, ARE GROWN FROM YEAR TO YEAR IN LUSH POTFULS. VIRTUALLY DOZENS OF HERBS—LIKE AGRIMONY, PENNYROYAL, VERBENA, HYSSOP, LAVENDER, AND CALAMINT—ARE USED FOR HEALING, WHILE OTHERS ARE USED IN COOKING. IN THE CITIES, HERBS MIGHT BE DISPLAYED ON THE CART OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD PRODUCE PEDDLER, AND NOWADAYS

TO REGONNEGT ME WITH MY ADOPTED LAND. MY GREEK ALMOST-FAMILY WOULD LIKE TO GIVE ME A SUMPTUOUS MEAL AND GIANT BEANS ARE NOT THEIR IDEA OF LUXURY, BUT IT IS MINE. I CAN GET A CHOP ANYWHERE, BUT GREECE’S HUGE WHITE BEANS, SOFTENED AND SIMMERED WITH TOMATO AND ONION UNTIL THE SAUGE IS THE BEAN AND THE BEAN IS THE SAUCE—THAT’S AS RARE AS GAVIAR. AS A PERFECT COMPLEMENT, MY CHOICE IS NOT CHAMPAGNE BUT RATHER ORDINARY BROUSKO, THE VILLAGE RED, RIGHT FROM THE BARREL. Not quite classic, my version of

and the Moor A Final Validation How Spices Got to Greece LUSCIOUS PUDDINGS SWEETNESS BY THE SPOONFUL Croesus and His Golden Coins Plato, the “Cool” Philosopher SEVEN INNOVATIVE SWEETS Night Wine, Day Wine, and the Barefoot Compressor Cyclades Village Wedding CEREMONIAL SWEETS The Ottoman Rule and the Greek Fight for Independence CONVERSION TABLES BIBLIOGRAPHY INDEX INTRODUCTION the olive, the caper, AND THE LEGACY OF GREEK FOOD BAKED BY A STARK AND CRYSTAL SUN, ENHANCED

evening’s soporific finale, Greeks have studded the tapestry of their marvelous cuisine with two particular native foods: the olive and the caper. The one was domesticated on Greek shores so many eons ago that the story of its earliest cultivation is lost. The other sprouts wild from almost every cliff and rock outcropping. THE OLIVE AND THE CAPER Farmers of the first civilization in Greece, the Minoans, began the cultivation of the olive. By the time of classical Greece, the tree was held

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