tmux Taster

tmux Taster

Mark McDonnell

Language: English

Pages: 96

ISBN: 1484207769

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


tmux Taster is your short, concise volume to learn about tmux, the terminal multiplexer that allows you to multiplex several virtual consoles. With tmux you can access multiple separate terminal sessions inside a single terminal window or remote terminal session, and do so much more.

Through the seven to-the-point chapters, you'll learn the fundamentals of tmux, scripting and automation, pane and window management, pair programming, and workflow management.

Increase your productivity by using a terminal multiplexer - start with tmux Taster today.

What you’ll learn

  • What terminal multiplexers are and how you can use tmux
  • How to manage scripting and automation
  • How to manage pane and window management
  • How to undertake pair programming and workflow management

Who this book is for

tmux Taster is for anyone who wants to get started with a terminal multiplexer, and get up and running quickly. This is a short, concise volume that will get you up and running quickly and efficiently.

Table of Contents

1. Chapter One: Starting with a Terminal Multiplexer

2. Chapter Two: Fundamentals

3. Chapter Three: Modifications

4. Chapter Four: Copy and Paster

5. Chapter Five: Scripting and Automation

6. Chapter Six: Pane/Window Management

7. Chapter Seven: Pair Programming

8. Chapter Eight: Workflow Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29 CHAPTER 2 N FUNDAMENTALS Windows In tmux, windows work in a similar way to how “tabs” work within your web browser. To create a new window, run the

c command (or :new-window, if you’re using the command prompt). You’ll notice when creating a new window that tmux will automatically name it after the process that’s running. For example, it will name the window zsh, as that binary is the default terminal shell running. At any point, if you have to rename the current window, you can do this

install something like xclip on your Linux VM, you’ll still have issues getting the preceding tmux configurations to send tmux selections to the xclip program (as a terminal-only version of Linux inside a VM won’t have the required X-Windows dependencies). 41 CHAPTER 4 N COPY AND PASTE If you’re using Vagrant to start and manage your VMs, then the solution to this problem is quite simple. First, you’ll have to install and run the software XQuartz (http://xquartz.macosforge.org/, which is a

tmux running, and for those who have never seen tmux before, you’ll likely not notice much difference in your terminal’s appearance (other than a bar at the foot of your screen, but I’ll come back to this and describe what the bar is and what it means later), because visually, tmux should act as a container around your terminal. Now, let’s say we want to open a text file within the popular Vim text editor (e.g., vim ~/foo.txt) and modify the content by deleting a specific selection. Chances are

restoring Vim sessions (e.g., set -g @resurrect-strategy-vim 'session'). I recommend reading the plug-in documentation for the full details. Sample Usage Using the plug-in is very easy. Once you have tmux open and in a state that you want to record, execute the key binding

, to store the current layout and contents. Once you restart the machine (you can mimic this by executing the tmux command

:kill-server) and open tmux afresh, you’ll notice that the state is lost. To resume the

restoring Vim sessions (e.g., set -g @resurrect-strategy-vim 'session'). I recommend reading the plug-in documentation for the full details. Sample Usage Using the plug-in is very easy. Once you have tmux open and in a state that you want to record, execute the key binding

, to store the current layout and contents. Once you restart the machine (you can mimic this by executing the tmux command

:kill-server) and open tmux afresh, you’ll notice that the state is lost. To resume the

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